Posted on 9 Comments

NEPA

This is my caged balcony in Nigeria. This is noise broadcasts day in and night out a few hundred yards from my bedroom. My neighbor rigged her industrial model generator with a 10 gallon diesel tank so it runs for hours.

The history of electricity development in Nigeria can be traced back to the end of the 19th century when the first generating power plant was installed in the city of Lagos in 1898. From then until 1950, the pattern of electricity development was in the form of individual electricity power undertaking scattered all over the towns. Some of the few undertaking were Federal Government bodies under the Public Works Dept, some by the Native Authorities and others by the Municipal Authorities.

In 116years NEPA tops the list as one of the most corrupt governmental agencies in Nigeria. NEPA has been privatized by the current ruling party, meaning the greed politicians are now using their also greed corporate friends as proxies to continue the corruption.

Most Nigerians buy the transformers, electric wires and poles used in transmitting electricity from NEPA, they also bribe/pay NEPA employees for installation so how can the Nigerian government privatize what they don’t own.

#JujuFilms 

9 thoughts on “NEPA

  1. We are yet to feel the impact of the privatization of PHCN…..there is still epileptic supply of electricity.Though,I have no proof,but my instincts tells me that some cabals doesn’t want the power sector to function optimally,they are benefiting from the sorry-state of Nigeria’s electricity state.How will they sell their generators when there is constant power supply?Just a question though.

  2. Sad to say, but this is not just a problem in Nigeria. In Suriname, we have one government owned power company, and they do whatever they want. It’s ridiculous. We however, don’t frequently use power generators, because they are expensive. In Nigeria, what is the price of a generator compared to the price of solar panels?

    1. There is an oil cartel in Nigeria backed by foreign governments to keep Nigerians dependent on electric generators. There is also the generator importing industry backed by a corrupt government, then there is the retail market for petrol, diesel and parts. There is the conspiracy to keep solar panels out of the buying power of the average Nigerian also making solar technology unreliable. Bottom line there is no rush in making solar energy an alternative form of energy in Nigeria.

      1. Thanks for clarifying that!

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