Ocimum gratissimum, commonly known as scent leaf or Clove basil, is found in many tropical countries. Some of its vernacular names in Nigeria include Ncho-anwu or Ahuji in Igbo; Efinrin in Yoruba, Aramogbo in Edo and Daidoya in Hausa. Scent leaf has numerous medical uses.

Telfairia occidentalis is a tropical vine grown in West Africa as a leaf vegetable and for its edible seeds. Common names for the plant include fluted gourd, fluted pumpkin, and ugu in the Igbo language. T. occidentalis is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family and is indigenous to southern Nigeria.[1] The fluted gourd grows in many nations of West Africa, but is mainly cultivated in [Igboland|southeastern Nigeria] and it is used primarily in soups and herbal medicines.[2] Although the fruit is inedible, the seeds produced by the gourd are high in protein and fat, and can, therefore, contribute to a well-balanced diet. The plant is a drought-tolerant, dioecious perennial that is usually grown trellised.

T. occidentalis is traditionally used by an estimated 30 to 35 million people indigenous people in Nigeria, including the Efik, Ibibio, and Urhobo.[3] However, it is predominantly used by the Igbo ethnic group, who continue to cultivate the gourd for food sources and traditional medicines.[4] A recurring subject in the Igbo’s folklore, the fluted gourd is noted to have healing properties and was used as a blood tonic, to be administered to the weak or ill.[3] It is endemic to southern Nigeria, and was an asset to international food trades of the Igbo ethnic group.[3] Source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telfairia_occidentalis

Scent leaf and Ugwu, Dutse Market, Dutse, Nigeria. #JujuFilms

Scent leaf and Ugwu, Dutse Market, Dutse, Nigeria. #JujuFilms

Scent leaf and Ugwu, Dutse Market, Dutse, Nigeria. #JujuFilms

Scent leaf and Ugwu, Dutse Market, Dutse, Nigeria. #JujuFilms

Scent leaf and Ugwu, Dutse Market, Dutse, Nigeria. #JujuFilms

Scent leaf and Ugwu, Dutse Market, Dutse, Nigeria. #JujuFilms